We’ve just come to the end of our six week course on Writing, Myth and Tradition. It’s been incredibly stimulating. We were lucky enough to work with a highly talented group of writers from Myanmar and from all around the world. On the course we looked at the myths of writing and the writing of myths, from the small scale to the large.

Over the six weeks we covered a lot of ground. We looked at the stories that make us who we are. We plunged into the murky darkness of family and community secrets. We looked at the tangle of truth-telling, fabrication, memory and forgetting in the stories we tell about ourselves, each other and the world. We asked some difficult ethical questions about what it means to tell these stories. We explored face-to-face storytelling, and how this can be translated into well-crafted prose. And, in the final week, we looked at the art of self-mythologising for writers, and at the publishing world.

The course has certainly deepened our own reflections on what it means to write. And working with so many writers who are engaged in so many different projects has enlarged our sense of the world. So we’re already looking forward to starting our next course, called Remaking the World: Creativity, Writing and Activism. The six week course starts on the April 22nd, and is on Monday nights at the Parami Institute in Yangon from 7pm to 9pm.  Get in touch if you are interested in joining us. 

Image: Puppet Show in Myanmar, c.1897. Bodleian Ms. Burm. a. 5 fol 140.jpg 

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